Supreme Court brings relief to practising doctors

It was on June, 2021 when a medical officer, Dr Seuj Kumar Senapati was assaulted by some miscreants in Hojai district in Assam

The Supreme Court of India has come up with a solution to minimize or stop the violence against the doctors. A bench of judges consisting of Ajay Rastogi and Abhay S. Oka on Wednesday said that the doctors are expected to take reasonable care, but no professional can assure that the patient will come back home after overcoming the crisis.
It was highlighted that the medical practitioners should no longer be held liable, simply because things go wrong as a result of any kind of mischance or choosing one reasonable course of treatment in preference to another.
The Supreme Court on Wednesday observed that the doctors are free to provide their best services to the patients along with all the other medical assistance but in case if they are unable to save the patient, the guardian of the patients will not be able to blame the doctor over any kind of medical negligence.
It was highlighted that the medical practitioners should no longer be held liable, simply because things go wrong as a result of any kind of mischance or choosing one reasonable course of treatment in preference to another.
It was on June, 2021 when a medical officer, Dr Seuj Kumar Senapati was assaulted by some miscreants in Hojai district in Assam. Dr Senapati, who was serving at the Covid care centre at that time was attacked by a knife along with being kicked and hit by a mob.
representative image
Image: representative image
A similar incident was reported from Assam, where a senior doctor, Deven Dutta had to loose his life following a mob attack. In the recent years, the people from the medical fraternity have faced violence in various forms from their patient's guardians for various reasons. In the majority of the cases (60-70%), such violence took the form of either verbal abuse or aggressive gesture.
Very often, those who abused a medical person were patients themselves who were under the influence of alcohol and drug and were delirious or were in the psychiatry wards. Increased risk of violence was also recorded when a general physician was on house calls, particularly at night.
Anxiety, long waiting period before the patient could speak to a doctor and the feeling that doctor is not giving enough attention to his/her patients engender frustration giving rise to violence. Majority of the hospitals in India do not have good grievance addressal system in place. Legal procedure in India also takes inordinately long time.



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