Painless way to Discover a Healthy Life

A new technology introduced at the University of Newcastle is expected to give the medical scenario a new horizon

It has been more than 30 years that Emi Das, the 89-year-old lady from Guwahati has been suffering from diabetes. Her morning routine usually starts by monitoring the blood sugar levels using an invasive machine, followed by 3 pricks of insulin per day.
In a conversation with Fit North East, Dr Rumi Das, daughter of Emi Das, said, "Initially when she was diagnosed with diabetes, it was a matter of stress for us. But now we are habituated with the testing procedure and insulin procedure at home".
Apart from this chronic disease the main challenge faced every day was the painful pricks that had to be done every day either to check the sugar levels or induce the insulin. Besides, the frequent injections often caused various issues like pain under the skin, swelling, hardening of the muscle under the skin.
There are millions of people around the globe who go through relatable issues as they suffer from this chronic disease. But now it seems that there is a hope of relief from getting pricked more often.
The technology works by detecting glucose into a transistor which can then transmit the presence of glucose. Since the electronic materials in the transistor are inks, the test can be made through printing at a low cost.
A team of scientists led by researcher and physicist, Paul Dastoor at the University of Newcastle have developed a unique technique of blood sugar testing. The technique involves the use of non-invasive strips which will check the glucose levels via saliva. The technology works by detecting glucose into a transistor which can then transmit the presence of glucose. Since the electronic materials in the transistor are inks, the test can be made through printing at a low cost.
The lead researcher Paul Dastoor holding the kit
Image: The lead researcher Paul Dastoor holding the kit
As said by Dastoor the new innovation was a result of the accidental experiment as the team was working with an aim to rule out something with solar cells.
The kit is in its trial test stage in Australia. As per expert doctors, this latest technology can also be transferred to Covid-19 testing and allergen, hormone and cancer patients.
Dr Rumi Das said that the unique introduction in the medical field is something to be appreciated. "It will definitely lessen the pain of the patients to some extent and as it is manufactured at a western university, I feel that it will be successful in showing precise and appropriate results"  she added.



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