Online classes during COVID pandemic spoilt students

Internet has facilitated students' access to free obscene and chat sites strictly prohibited for young students

COVID-19 pandemic not only derailed life across the world, but also overturned the education system and spoilt students mentally and morally during online studies through internet, said Naharlagun-based G-Sector Govt Secondary School headmistress Tarh Yaku.
"The internet facilitated students access to free obscene and chat sites, strictly prohibited for young students in their most vulnerable age. Instead of studies, they were lured to visit these sites leaving unexplained impacts on their fragile minds, resulting in conflicts with parents and teachers," she said, adding that she has explained this to state Chief Secretary.
Hardly 2% students studied online as poor internet and repeated failure of power supply was the greatest hindrance, she said. She also said that her school with strength of over 1,100 in classes-I to X has RCC buildings and computers. But most of the schools in the state lacks infrastructure, particularly girls' toilet, not to talk about computers.
Many teachers have been inoculated and few have registered for vaccination, she said, adding all examinations were conducted with strict adherence to SOPs in tune with COVID appropriate behavior and same would be followed as the school would reopen from September 1.
Classes were suspended during April to October, 2020 during COVID-19 lockdown. Online classes were conducted during October to January 2020. Annual examinations were conducted which though had yielded cent per cent results, she said. However, tom-toming about online classes is useless without any IT teacher in the schools as no one is an expert as there is none to help in case any problem, she said with conviction.
"Students were not interested in online classes and we failed to teach the way desired due to disruption by poor internet connectivity," said teacher Memak Lamgu
"Students were not interested in online classes and we failed to teach the way desired due to disruption by poor internet connectivity," said teacher Memak Lamgu, sitting nearby her.
Students appearing for an exam at school
Image: Students appearing for an exam at school
Such teaching devoid of any quality was only for name sake, except quantity by marking the students present or absent. Online classes failed to fulfill the aspirations of the students and high expectation of parents, she said with remorse.
Explaining the sordid tale of students, class-X students Nikh Tape and Lokam Tape said that buying good quality mobile phones was not affordable as they belonged to middle class families.
"Our colony has very poor internet connectivity for which attending online study was not possible and there was none at home to guide for which our studies suffered. We are ignorant how to compensate the loss," they equivocally added.




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