No reason to fear for COVID-19 vaccines

In India, nearly 447 adverse reactions were reported out of the 2.1 lakh people vaccinated so far

In India, nearly 447 adverse reactions were reported out of the 2.1 lakh people vaccinated so far. Less than five have been reported to be serious as reported on January 26.
Covaxin and Covishield were rolled out on January 16 across India to inoculate three crore healthcare and frontline workers in the first phase of the vaccination drive.
While Covaxin is developed by Bharat Biotech, Covishield is developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University with Serum Institute of India for low- and middle-income countries.
Both vaccines are being administered in two doses.
India plans to inoculate a total 30 crore population -- one crore healthcare workers (public and private health facilities), around 2 crore state & central police personnel, armed forces personnel, home guards, civil defences & disaster management volunteers, municipal workers, prison staff & revenue workers involved in containment and surveillance.
Apart from them, around 27 crore population belonging to prioritized age groups, those who are above 50 years and those who are below 50 years with co-morbidities in a phased manner.
Both Serum Institute of India and Bharat Biotech have released fact sheets mentioning "side effects" of their vaccines to make people aware before receiving the vaccines.
Union Health Minister Dr. Harsh Vardhan, in a series of tweets, had said: "After administered COVID-19 vaccine, some individuals may have side effects like mild fever, pain at the injection site, and body ache. This is similar to the side effects that occur post some other vaccines. The vaccines are safe and do not cause infertility".
A total of 191,100 people were vaccinated in India on the first day of the nationwide vaccination drive against the COVID-19.
Vaccine development is a lengthy and complex process, often lasting 10-15 years and involving a combination of public and private involvement.
Several vaccines, namely smallpox, rabies, plague, cholera, and typhoid for humans were developed by the end of the 19th century. However, no regulation of vaccine production existed then, Paul Offit, MD, of College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
According to experts, most people are unlikely to have severe allergic reactions to Pfizer -BioNTech vaccine but the shots might come with temporary side effects such as fever and muscle pain
The current system for developing, testing and regulating vaccines developed during the 20th century involves standard procedures and regulations. The vaccines allowed by the regulator
Representational image.
Image: Representational image.
According to experts, most people are unlikely to have severe allergic reactions to Pfizer -BioNTech vaccine but the shots might come with temporary side effects such as fever and muscle pain, Sarah Toy reported in The Wall Street Journal.
Two of the first people to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine in the U.K. had allergic reactions to the injection, the country's National Health Service said.
The U.S. health regulators are expected to authorize the emergency use of two vaccines of Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE and another of Moderna Inc.
While researchers haven't found serious safety issues with the vaccines, they expect possible side effects mostly of mild to moderate intensity, including fever, fatigue, headache, and arm pain. Severe allergic reactions are likely to be rare, they say.
The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the body that gave the go-ahead for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in the U.K., has told doctors and hospitals that any person with a history of significant allergic reactions to a vaccine, medicine or food shouldn't receive the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.
Moreover, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on February 10 reported that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has issued interim recommendations for use of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines to prevent COVID-19 in the United States.
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage the world including India. Century-old BCG vaccine-developed antibodies reportedly offered protection in India to become a hot topic of discussion.
First BCG vaccinations were launched as a pilot project in two centres in 1948 in India while vaccination was extended to schools in almost all Indian states in 1949.
The most common side effects of the BCG vaccine were fever, headache and swollen glands while more serious complications included abscesses or bone inflammation. Most children develop a sore at the injection point.
If the BCG vaccination reduces the severity of COVID-19, there is no reason to have fear for COVID-19 vaccines?



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