Nipah Virus claims life of a 12-year-old, 20 others serious

Strict lockdown imposed up to a distance of 3 kilometres from Mavoor, the area of residence of the boy who died due to the Nipah Virus

While preparations are going on to tackle the probable problems the world would be facing after the approach of the third wave of Covid-19, another terror strikes Kerala. This time it is the Nipah Virus which has claimed the life of a 12-year-old boy on September 2, 2021. The 12-year-old was undergoing treatment from September 1 at the Medical College at the Kozhikode area in Kerela.
 The structure of the Nipah virus cell
Image: The structure of the Nipah virus cell
Kerala Health Minister Veene George said that more than 188 people are suspected of carrying the virus but out of these 188 primary contacts, 20 have been hospitalized and are undergoing treatment. It was informed that a strict action plan has been formulated to contain the spread of infection in the State.
The HeS-sG recombinant Antigen as subunit vaccine used against Nipah and Hendra virus is currently in clinical development as an emergency vaccine countermeasure.
Strict lockdown has been imposed up to a distance of 3 kilometres from Mavoor, the area of residence of the boy who died due to the Nipah Virus. It is to be noted that earlier in 2018, the Nipah Virus claimed 17 lives in Kozhikode.
The scientific name of this deadly virus is Nipah Henipavirus and it is a bat-prone virus. This virus is commonly occurring in South and Southeast Asia. One infected with this virus might show symptoms like fever, headache, cough, sore throat, difficulty in breathing and vomiting. This deadly virus causes fever and encephalitis (or inflammation of the brain) leading to seizures and coma. The lucky ones who survive might be accompanied by pneumonia for their entire lifetime.
A representative image showing the spread of the virus
Image: A representative image showing the spread of the virus
As per a study carried out in associations with the scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Nipah Virus is more likely to be transmitted from a person to the one who is older, or a male or someone have breathing issues. The Nipah virus is detected in the saliva and excreta of bats and remains alive for up to three days on the fruits partially eaten by the bats. The virus does not survive in the air for a long period, so it cannot spread for a considerable distance through it.
The HeS-sG recombinant Antigen as subunit vaccine used against Nipah and Hendra virus is currently in clinical development as an emergency vaccine countermeasure.



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