Improve your sleep hygiene with these simple tips

Listening to discouraging reports about the new coronavirus on the evening news before bed may not be a good idea and could keep your mind racing throughout the night

Many a time we find it challenging to do what really is the simplest activity for any living being: fall asleep. Though a common problem, difficulties in falling asleep can manifest into serious physical and mental health issues. Needless to say, the problem itself is often caused by failing mental and physical health.
We at Fit Northeast spoke to a couple of psychiatrists and arrived at these tips that can help you sleep better.
Get outside and get moving: Fresh air and exercise can help to calm and tire you out, while vitamin D from the sunshine helps regulate circadian rhythms to keep your sleep consistent.
Establish a bedtime routine: Consistency in your bedtime routine each night can go a long way in helping you achieve better quality sleep. Your body will naturally take cues and prompt drowsiness from the steps you regularly take to wind down, such as reading, taking a warm bath, or writing in a journal.
Style your bedroom for sleep: Keep temperatures cool, gadgets and electronics to a minimum and bedding comfortable yet simple. Also check your pillows to make sure they pack the perfect amount of comfort: not too hard or too soft so your head and neck are comfortably supported.
Keep temperatures cool, gadgets and electronics to a minimum and bedding comfortable yet simple
Nix daytime naps: With extra time on your hands, or perhaps because of working from home, it may be easy and enticing to sneak in a daytime nap. While the occasional nap can be a great reset for the rest of the day, it may rob you of the more important and restorative sleep your body needs at night.
Representative image
Image: Representative image
Consider what you watch on television: Listening to discouraging reports about the new coronavirus on the evening news before bed may not be a good idea and could keep your mind racing throughout the night. Opt for shows that are lighter and more entertaining later in the day.
Set a wake-up time and stick to it seven days a week: Even if you go to bed late one night or have trouble falling asleep, keep your wake-up time the same. This is particularly important during the pandemic, when many of us are pushing our wake-up times later. The wake-up time you set for yourself doesn't have to be early. It just has to be consistent.
Stop 'trying' to sleep if you're anxious about sleeping: Find something quiet to do, like read or watch television (though nothing too upsetting or stimulating). When you feel sleepy again, get back in bed.If it's a difficult night, you might have to do this a few times. This works because worrying about sleep and lying in bed (trying to sleep) actually perpetuates insomnia.
Stop checking the clock: If you do not know what time it is, you cannot start counting how much time is left in the night to sleep. If you have an alarm clock in your room, turn it around. As long as you have an alarm set, you do not need to know the time.



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