All about knee arthritis

Full lockdowns, partial lockdowns and the fear of visiting doctor clinics and hospitals might have put a full stop to your consultations with the physiotherapist but do not despair

Knee arthritis is one of the most common problems seen in people over the age of 50. It is basically a degenerative disease of joints with acute inflammation. No activity and disuse are deleterious for the health of the knee joint. Absence of any mechanical stimulation leads to more rapid cartilage degeneration. In this scenario light to moderate activities provide multiple benefits.
So what causes knee arthritis? Knee arthritis may occur as a result of various factors. The most common causes that are largely responsible for knee arthritis include dislocation (any major accident or fall may cause knee dislocation), infection of the joint, any deformity present at birth or after an accident, obesity, hemophilia, acromegaly and hyperthyroidism. Generally women above the age of 55 are more likely to have knee arthritis. Hereditary factors also play a role. This includes genetic mutations that might make a person more likely to develop knee arthritis. Knee arthritis may also be due to inherited abnormalities in the shape of the bones that surround the knee joint. Other causes of knee arthritis can be repetitive stress injuries.
Does knee arthritis have any clinical features? Knee arthritis has very customary features. For instance you will experience sharp pain that increases when you are active and decreases generally at rest. Swelling in the knee, restriction in movement, a feeling of warmth in the joint and an overall stiffness in the knee (especially when you get up in the morning) are common distinguishing features. A cracking sound can be heard when the knee moves and muscle spasms are also common when you have knee arthritis.
The good news is that knee arthritis can also be treated at home.
During this ongoing pandemic, full lockdowns, partial lockdowns and the fear of visiting doctor clinics and hospitals might have put a full stop to your consultations with the physiotherapist. However, the good news is that knee arthritis can also be treated at home.You must remember that this condition has got a lot to do with your weight and hence weight management is critical. Body weight increases the pressure on all the joints especially the knee joint. Every pound you gain will add 3 to 4 pounds of extra weight to your knees. Needless to say proper weight management can reduce a lot of risks and pain.
Representative image
Image: Representative image
One popular home therapy for knee arthritis is contrast bath or hot and cold therapy. The basic principle of contrast bath is to combine the effects of hot and cold bath together. The painful knee part is alternatively immersed in hot and cold water.The temperature of hot water should rage from 36 degree Celsius to 45 degree Celsius and the temperature of cold water should range between 15 to 20 degree Celsius. The treatment should begin with hot water and end with cold water. The cycle should be repeated 4 to 5 times. In addition knee arthritis can be conservatively managed at home through a healthy diet, regular exercise and use of a knee cap. Generous doses of turmeric in meals is a must as turmeric prevents inflammation.
Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are solely the author's and Fit NorthEast does not take any liability. Though the facts and information stated here are genuine and authentic we recommend that you consult your doctor/physiotherapist before trying the procedure as individual patient cases and sensitivities are different. 



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